1000fps no more

Different media file formats encode things like time and frame rates differently… or not at all.
 
WebM doesn’t list a frame rate; each frame is simply given a position in time. Meanwhile the older Ogg Theora codec defines a consistent, pre-defined frame rate for a stream, but allows frames to be declared as duplicates of the previous frame as an optimization.
 
At the intersection of these two, some files auto-converted from WebM to Ogg on Wikimedia’s servers end up claiming to encode a “1000 fps” video stream, where nearly all the frames are dupes and there’s actually ~25-30 or at most 60 actual frames per second.
 
I had to put a hack into my ogv.js player to handle these, because actually trying to draw 1000 frames per second was kind of slow. ;)
https://github.com/brion/ogv.js/issues/349

ogv.js 1.1.0 alpha now on npm

ogv.js 1.1.0-alpha.0 is now available for download:

Big thanks to Stephan Hesse who retooled large chunks of the build system using webpack, which brought us a lot closer to the npm package release.

ogv.js 1.1.0 is a drop-in update to 1.0; many internal classes are no longer leaked to global namespace, but the public OGV* classes remain as they are.

The internal AudioFeeder class is also available as a separate npm audio-feeder package; more internal classes will follow including the streaming URL reader and the WebGL-accelerated YUV canvas.

In addition to internal/build changes, this release has major fixes for seeking in ogg files, implements the volume property, and adds support for more properties and events (not yet 100% up to spec, but closer).

After a few more days shaking this out I’ll push it up to MediaWiki’s TimedMediaHandler extension, where it’ll make it to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons.